Vintage-Inspired Amusements: The Lady Magazine

I’ve discovered something new online! The internet is lovely for lovers of the vintage because you can find all sorts of original documents and vintage-inspired webpages so much more easily than when you had to go to the library and make a date with the microfiche viewer to see them.

The Lady magazine is apparently where Wodehouse got his inspiration for Aunt Dahlia’s Milady’s Boudoir periodical. And it’s not hard to see the resemblance. They even maintain a classified section for those seeking housekeepers, nannies, and other service personnel. Apart from those, they run articles about timeless style and a series of columns. They have a good old-fashioned agony aunt column, as well as an advice column for excellent manners that rivals the Grande Dame Judith Martin herself.

They also tend to provide styling, fashion, and interviews perhaps geared toward a more traditional audience. Rather than following trends, they focus on timeless advice for elegance. And they interviewed the current star of my new favorite show recently.

The magazine has been around since the 19th century and has the distinction of being Britain’s longest-running lady’s magazine. And issues appear weekly online. I love to read the features occasionally as they highlight a more timeless and elegant style than many American publications, particularly when it comes to home and fashion.

Reading such a publication gives me a profound sense of being connected to the history of publishing for ladies. Rather than being a magazine that pigeonholes us into assumptions about our interests in beauty or fashion or lace curtains, The Lady allows that ladies may have diverse interests and as such publishes diverse features, sometimes discussing food, or travel. The columns even target a range of ages, leaving few gaps in the possibilities that one will find something interesting to them. And the style is vintage and understated, rather than loud and trendy. All in all, it is a magazine that suits my style perfectly.

Everyday Scones

When I was little, my mother taught me about table manners by having tea parties. I never really understood the fake tea parties you see children characters on television having because when I had a tea party, I did not invite my stuffed animals and serve imaginary food. My mother set out real china and had finger sandwiches and scones.

Scones are one of my favorite baked goods, and something that I’ve perfected in my baking repetoire, although I generally bake rich, light cream scones. The other day, I woke up and I wanted scones with my breakfast tea, so I found a recipe for English scones, which tend to be less sweet and greasy than those things you find in American coffeeshops. And then I tweaked it just a little, using one cup of sprouted whole wheat flour and one cup of cake flour for the two cups of plain flour. They baked up tender, with enough structure to hold onto butter and jam at breakfast.

I folded in a handful of currants, leftover from Christmas cake baking, just before shaping and cutting them. It reminded me of the time I offered a friend a currant scone, to which he looked bewildered and answered, “Well, I wouldn’t want a past scone.” Some misunderstanding about “currant” versus “current,” it would seem. But these were both current scones and currant scones. I cut them into wedges, put two of them on a baking sheet, and tucked them into a hot oven.

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And then, I froze the rest of the batch. I laid them out on a baking sheet lined with parchment, put them in the freezer for about an hour, and then moved the now-solid wedges to a plastic zipper bag and froze them. So now, when I wake up in the morning, I can take a scone or two out of the freezer and put them on a baking sheet, preheat my oven, and have scones in about 15 minutes, just long enough to gather my wits, brew a cup of tea, and lay out the rest of my breakfast.

Half-Wheat Scones
(adapted from here)

1 cup cake flour
1 cup sprouted wheat flour
1 Tbsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. salt
2 Tbsp. sugar
4 Tbsp. butter, cut into cubes
1 beaten egg
6-8 Tbsp. milk
handful of dried fruit, peel, or nuts (optional)

Preheat your oven to 425 F and line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment. Stir together the flours, sugar, salt, and baking powder. Scatter the bits of butter over the dry mixture and work the butter in with your fingers until it resembles crumbly pebbles. Beat together the egg and 5 Tbsp. of milk and add to the dry ingredients. Stir together, adding more milk a dribble at a time if needed, until it comes together into a nice dough. Fold in the fruit or nuts or peel now it you like. Form into a circle and pat to 1/2″ thick. Cut into 8 wedges and bake for 8 or 9 minutes, until golden at the edges.